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Denis Kilcommons: The history of movie stars and their scents

Anyone connected with show business seems to have a perfume named after them

Youth Dew by Estee Lauder

Ady connected with show business seems to have a perfume named after them or are promoting a fragrance.

The aroma business is worth billions and major to minor celebrities are jumping on a band wagon that actually started in 1953 when Joan Crawford endorsed Estee Lauder’s Youth Dew.

A couple of years later, Marilyn Monroe showed how a word from a star could work wonders when she was asked what she wore in bed. “Chanel No 5,” was the reply, and sales were boosted.

The very first scent actually made for a star was when Hubert deGivenchy created a scent privately for Audrey Hepburn in 1957. She loved it but when he suggested putting it on sale she said: “Oh no. That’s forbidden.”

Eventually, she allowed it to be marketed in the 1960s as Givenchy L’Interdit or Forbidden.

Coty created Sophia for Ms Loren in 1981 and a range of other celebrity smells came soon after, including Forever Krystal from Linda Evans and Uninhibted from Cher.

The best of the new bunch was White Diamonds that was launched by Elizabeth Taylor in 1991, made and marketed by Elizabeth Arden, that remains one of the best selling perfumes in the world.

These days everybody and his dog has a perfume including Christina Aguilera, Beyonce, Justin Bieber, Paris Hilton, Lady Gaga, Madonna, Kylie Minogue and One Direction.

You might prefer the odour of Prince, Rihanna, Britney Spears, Taylor Swift, J-Lo, Kate Moss or Celine Dion.

Bruce Willis even has a perfume, but who wants to smell like a sweaty bald bloke in a torn vest?

David Beckham has both a perfume and a whisky brand, which could be useful if you get home late smelling like a distillery.

“It’s my David Beckham eau de toilette, love. I splashed it on all over.”

My wife Maria still prefers Youth Dew - the genuine choice of a genuine star.

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