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How you can have a suit like Conor McGregor - but it won't come cheap

What you'd pay for a Huddersfield-made suit - with or without swear words

You too can have a suit like Conor McGregor – but it isn’t going to be cheap!

The Irish fighter Conor McGregor wore a suit made from Huddersfield cloth – with the phrase “F*** You” woven into the pinstripe – when he confronted opponent Floyd Mayweather at a press conferences before their much-anticipated bout next month in Las Vegas.

The single-breasted navy suit was made from cloth was designed by Elland-based.Huddersfield Fine Worsteds (HFW), woven by Pennine Weavers in Keighley and finished by Moldgreen dyers and finishers W T Johnson.

The suit and its uncompromising message took the internet by storm – prompting one enterprising HFW employee to invite people interested in having their own suit made to email the firm for details.

Conor McGregor, right, taunts as Floyd Mayweather Jr. walks back to the podium during a news conference at Staples Center on Tuesday, July 11, 2017, in Los Angeles. The two will fight in a boxing match in Las Vegas on Aug. 26.(Image: AP)

But check your bank balance first. A suit like Conor’s could end up setting you back as much as £800.

HFW customers wanting their own bespoke pinstripe cloth – with the wording of their choice woven into the stripe – can expect to pay £400 a metre for three to five metres or £275 a metre for five to 10 metres, excluding VAT. A cheaper option is to have the wording woven into the stripe at the edge of the cloth at £175 a metre for five to 10 metres or £300 a metre for three to five metres.

Turning the cloth into a made-to-measure suit by a quality tailor can cost another £500.

HFW managing director Ian Milligan said: “Customers are very welcome to create their own 100% bespoke name stripe. They can contact us on info@hfwltd.com and we will help them through the process. The words can be similar to Conor McGregor’s or another creative phrase. It takes approximately six weeks to produce.”

Mr Milligan said the company more usually wove a customer’s name or business name in the stripes. Conor’s was the first to feature a phrase.

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