Young voters are set to let the older generation decide the outcome of the EU referendum - by failing to turn up to vote.

While much of the focus has been on the fact recent polls have put the ‘leave’ side ahead, there is another disturbing trend.

Namely, that young people - who tend to be more likely to vote ‘remain’ - are far less likely vote at all.

A TNS market research poll this week put the ‘leave’ side seven points ahead.

But it also showed only 15% of 18 to 24 year olds said they would definitely vote in the referendum, while 23% said they would probably vote.

A further 29% said they would probably not vote, while 23% said they would definitely not vote.

Compare that with respondents aged 55 or more.

Some 70% of those said they would definitely vote, while 10% said they would probably vote.

Only 10% said they would probably not vote, and 5% said they would definitely not vote.

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Combining the figures for those who said they would either definitely or probably vote in the referendum:

38% of 18 to 24 year olds plan to vote

45% of 25 to 34 year olds plan to vote

53% of 35 to 44 year olds plan to vote

66% of 45 to 54 year olds plan to vote

80% of people aged 55 or more plan to vote

One reason that matters is that the poll also shows that the older people are, the more likely they are to vote leave.

Some 64% of 18 to 24 year olds who do plan to vote plan to vote to remain.

That falls to 57% for 25 to 34 year olds, 54% for 35 to 44 year olds, 44% for 45 to 54 year olds and 40% for people aged 55-plus.

Whatever the outcome of the vote, it is the younger generation who will feel the effects for the longest.

Yet those same people seem happy to leave the result in the hands of other people.