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Vigilantes target home of convicted sex offender Scott Orme

Parents' anger led to public meeting in Brockholes

Convicted sex offender Scott Orme, of Holmebank Mews, Brockholes, hides his face as he leaves Kirklees Magistrates' Court in Huddersfield.

A man who admitted possessing sick images of children has been targeted by vigilantes, a court heard.

Concerned residents in the ‘family orientated community’ of Brockholes called a public meeting to discuss their concerns regarding child safeguarding.

The meeting was organised in response to the conviction of local man Scott Orme of possessing indecent images of children.

The small number of photographs included two falling into the most serious category A, which involves penetrative sex.

Orme, 22, also had two still images classified as category C and these were also found by police on his computer earlier this year.

A brief hearing at Kirklees Magistrates’ Court was told that the images involved children aged five to eight.

And his solicitor Anna Moran explained: “There have been difficulties with Mr Orme’s present accommodation and vigilantism in the neighbourhood.”

Some members of the public attended court for the hearing inside courtroom number one.

Orme, of Holmebank Mews, had been due to be sentenced for two admitted charges of making an indecent photograph of a child.

Prosecutor Shamaila Qureshi explained that a Sexual Harm Prevention Order (SHPO) was being sought by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) to prevent further similar offending.

She told magistrates: “For the order to be made you have to be satisfied that the defendant poses a risk of harm to the public.

“The images involve children aged between five and eight and the order is necessary to protect against the risk to these children.

“The order is appropriate and can be policed properly.”

Ms Moran said that while certain conditions of a SHPO were not contested, such as limiting Orme’s internet access, other conditions would be opposed.

She explained: “These orders are extremely serious and breaches of them are serious criminal offences and seek to make unlawful what would be perfectly lawful conduct.

“I can agree that prohibitions in terms of access to the internet would be usual but that there is a discernible risk to children is not made out in the case.”

The case was adjourned until September 29 to allow the CPS to liaise with police and ensure what the order is drafted properly.

On that date the matter will be heard by the resident District Judge Michael Fanning.

In the meantime Orme is banned from having unsupervised contact with any child aged under 18 as part of his conditional bail.

A condition to reside at his address will not be enforced due to problems with his neighbours. It is understood he has moved out of the rented house.

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