Fire fighters in West Yorkshire are reminding people in Huddersfield of the do’s and don’t’s when it comes to firework season.

With bonfire night fast approaching, sales of fireworks and sparklers are popping up in our local supermarkets.

But not many are aware of their rights and the rules when it comes to setting off Roman Candles, the fire service say.

Issues over safety and anti-social behaviour are a common concern for police and rescue services, with worrying figures showing more children are hurt by improper use of fireworks than adults.

It is against the law for anyone the age of 18 to carry fireworks in public, and to be sold fireworks.

Video thumbnail, Mirfield bonfire and fireworks display 2015 - from above
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People setting off fireworks between 11pm and 7am is breaking the law, apart from on Bonfire Night, Diwali, New Year and Chinese New Year where the ban stands from midnight until 7am.

Vendors selling fireworks also need a licence, according the law.

They can only be sold between October 15 and November 10.

These rules also stand for December 26 to New Year, and the three days leading up to and including Chinese New Year and Diwali.

And while sparklers may seem like harmless fun, the fire service are reminding parents they can get five times hotter than cooking oil spluttering in a frying pan.

While rockets reach speeds of 150mph, a firework shell can launch as high as 200m.

Clr Shabir Pandor, said: “Although fireworks can be fun, fireworks that do not meet safety requirements or are used incorrectly can cause a great deal of harm.

Kirklees Council Deputy Leader Clr. Shabir Pandor.

“Anybody who is unclear about the law should contact Trading Standards.”

Aerial wheels, shells-in-mortar, air bombs, bangers, mini-rockets, fireworks with “erratic flight” and category 4 professional display fireworks are all banned from being sold to the general public.

Anyone breaking the laws surrounding fireworks can be fined up to £5,000 and imprisoned for up to six months.

Police also have the right to impose £90 to anyone using them illegally.