A town centre music festival hit the right note.

Hundreds of people from across the country and abroad descended on Huddersfield at the weekend to enjoy the return of the Grand Northern Ukulele Festival.

And many more got to hear some of the uplifting music for free, thanks to colourfully-dressed performers and fans who filled the streets.

They were all there to catch a show or workshop at the main venue, the Lawrence Batley Theatre, which was turned into an ukulele mecca with several stages for the occasion.

Grand Northern Ukelele Festival, Huddersfield - Rag House Band performing outside Lawrence Batley Theatre.

And every genre from reggae and opera to burlesque and comedy was covered at the event by around 50 acts who came from as far away as Canada and the USA.

“It’s the first time I’ve felt relaxed about the festival,” said Mary Agnes Krell, its producer and director.

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“It’s gone really well and we’ve had lots of people from Huddersfield come along to the free events and find out more about the instrument.

“I hope that we’ve shown everyone that ukuleles can be used in whatever style of music you want to make.

See the Rag House Band performing outside Lawrence Batley Theatre!

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“Bringing local, national and international acts together builds a great community and it encourages them all to push themselves in what they do.”

Amongst the headliners at the theatre was US YouTube folk sensation Danielle Ate the Sandwich, vaudevillian act Kiki Lovechild and Yorkshire indie band Hope and Social, who created their first ever ukulele heavy set.

Tim Cooke and Lez Hilton, of Chonkinfeckle, created a live soundtracked video on stage filled with old folk songs of the railways.

Grand Northern Ukelele Festival, Huddersfield - audience at Lawrence Batley Theatre.

“It’s our first time here and it’s been great to catch up with friends and make new ones,” said Tim.

Vinyl Tap was another venue that hosted free gigs on Saturday, with dozens of acts playing.

US reveller Jerry Jaspar was one of many to travel from afar.

“I’m from Santa Cruz and having a lovely time,” he said. “It’s been wonderful to see so many people in the streets enjoying the music.”