A new hospital for Huddersfield could be built by 2021 as part of controversial new plans, according to local NHS chiefs.

The 1960s-built Huddersfield Royal Infirmary could be demolished and replaced with a new, smaller hospital as part of the Right Care Right Time Right Place plan.

And, according to a schedule released by hospital trust chiefs, the 120-bed facility could be built within five years.

The new Huddersfield Royal Infirmary (HRI) will have an urgent care centre but, crucially, no emergency care unit.

Ian Sanderson releases #HandsoffHRI fundraising album

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Meanwhile, emergency care services will be housed at an expanded Calderdale Royal Hospital (CRH), Halifax, according to a five-year strategy.

According to the document, produced by Calderdale and Huddersfield Foundation Trust, they may expand CRH onto Dryclough Close which the trust owns.

Additional storeys may be added to the existing CRH, opened in 2001, and a multi-storey carpark could be built to accommodate greater numbers of patients, visitors and staff.

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The trust, which runs HRI and CRH, also says it may expand CRH onto to ‘adjoining land’.

The plan adds: “These options will be appraised in conjunction with a review of opportunities to use trust space elsewhere.”

Detailed plans of the new HRI and expanded CRH, which will be increased from 400 to up to 700 beds, are expected to be revealed by May 2018.

The next stage of the #HandsoffHRI campaign

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This would follow the appointment of a construction firm in the first quarter of 2019 to build the new developments.

The document adds: “CHFT understands the challenge, time and resource it will take to effectively implement its five-year strategic plan, a key component of which is delivering the proposed model of care for hospital services through reconfiguration.

“Designing an appropriate implementation strategy is crucial to the success of the five-year strategic plan and all the initiatives which underpin it.

“An implementation plan that maximises the benefits of strategic initiatives, including but not limited to reconfiguration, without jeopardising ‘business as usual’ has been developed.

“It is vitally important that all implementation planning is geared towards realising the strategic goals and projected benefits for the future state trust model.”