Holmfirth action man Chris Harling is feeling on top of the world after scaling Mount Everest for the second time.

The 42-year-old led a team of six, which included a second Holmfirth climber Andy Taylor, up the tough North Ridge of the world’s highest peak, in a week when five people died on the mountain.

All Chris’s team have now returned safely to base camp, and are expected to arrive back in the UK within the next few days.

Chris, whose family are from Huddersfield, grew up in the Lake District and recently moved to Holmfirth where he plans to start a new business.

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He was able to send a picture of himself on the summit to his dad John, who lived in Birkby before moving to the Lake District.

John said: “I am very pleased that he has had another successful attempt and they are back down safely.

Chris Harling, right, on the summit of Everest with one of his team

“I am never unduly worried. He has to do what he has to do. It’s not for wimps.”

Chris has always been into outdoor adventure and his dad said he bought him a pair of climbing boots before he ever wore shoes.

Chris has over 21 years experience teaching a range of outdoor activities. His vast climbing and mountaineering experience has taken him to six continents.

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He first scaled Everest nine years ago, successfully climbing the North Ridge, and went back last year, but when devastating earthquakes hit the region he had to abort.

On his latest climb he is representing Adventure Peaks, which has been organising expeditions for 16 years.

Chris at around 7,200m Pic credit: Adventure Peaks

Director and owner David Pritt said Chris had been in radio contact during the climb. The team set out last month. After acclimatising they began their ascent and four of the team reached the summit on Sunday.

Mr Pritt said: “There are five climbers plus Chris. Two had to turn round when they were close to the summit. They didn’t have the right energy levels and sensibly decided to return to camp.

“Chris is a freelance instructor who was engaged for the expedition, and has been contacting us every two or three days.

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“It’s been a very good expedition.”

The climb came as Everest claimed five more victims.

The five who lost their lives were from two separate expeditions.

It is believed three of the victims died after suffering altitude sickness.

Chris at 7,500m, with the temperature at -20C Pic credit: Adventure Peaks

The bodies of two more who were missing have reportedly been found.

Mr Pritt said: “Everest has its dangers and they are dangers you cannot totally remove. But there are deaths on the hills and mountains of the Lake District. People go into it knowing there is a possibility.”

Chris is setting up an events business in Holmfirth, aimed at adventure. His dad said: “It will be things like triathlons with a twist. It will be all very energetic, which seems to be a growth industry at the moment.”

Mount Everest is the Earth’s highest mountain. Located in the Mahalangur mountain range in Nepal and Tibet, its peak is 8,848 metres (29,029 ft) above sea level.

The first recorded efforts to reach Everest’s summit were made by British mountaineers. A 1922 expedition saw seven people killed in an avalanche.

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Two years later, George Mallory and Andrew Irvine made a final summit attempt but never returned, sparking debate as to whether they were the first to reach the top. They had been spotted high on the mountain that day but disappeared in the clouds, never to be seen again, until Mallory’s body was found in 1999 at 8,155 m (26,755 ft) on the North face.

The team beginning the climb to 7,500m where the snow ridge ends Pic credit: Adventure Peaks

Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hillary made the first official ascent of Everest in 1953 using the southeast ridge route.

Around 800 people attempt to climb Everest each year, and more than 4,000 have scaled the summit.

But more than 200 people have died on Everest, with many bodies said to be visible on the mountainside.

Sixteen guides died in an avalanche in 2014, followed by an earthquake which killed 18 people last year.