How much alcohol do you drink? Bid to get people talking units and underage drinking

DO you know what a unit of alcohol is and how many units you drink a week?

DO you know what a unit of alcohol is and how many units you drink a week?

And how many teenagers are drinking alcohol in Kirklees every week?

Now help is at hand to let you understand the risks.

Kirklees and Calderdale councils and the health trusts are aiming to get people talking about alcohol consumption during National Alcohol Awareness Week.

Simone Arratoonian, Health Improvement Practitioner Specialist at NHS Kirklees, said: “People seem to love to talk about drinking in a light-hearted way, we are trying to encourage more people to have conversations with their friends or family about how much they are drinking, and how often – and whether they think it could affect them or their families.

“We don’t talk enough about how drinking has become more acceptable, and what this means for our families.”

It has been revealed that around one in five 14-year-olds living in the Kirklees area drink alcohol weekly or more.

But legally, can they?

The law says that people aged 16 or 17 can drink beer, wine or cider with a meal, but only if it is bought by an adult and they are accompanied by an adult.

But there’s a catch – if the 16 or 17-year-old is not having a meal, it is against the law for anyone of any age to buy alcohol for someone under 18 to drink in a pub or a public place.

The recommendations for female adults are to drink no more than two or three units a day and 14 in a week.

For men the advice is to have three to four units a day or fewer than 21 a week.

One glass of wine is around two units, one pint of beer is around three units.

And health practitioners say adults should have at least two alcohol-free days per week.

Simone added: “Where someone is concerned about their drinking, we hope the campaign may give them confidence to have a conversation with their GP or pharmacist, to find out some of the facts about drinking or get some advice about cutting down.”

Chief Supt Chris Hardern, police Divisional Commander for Calderdale, said: “Although having a couple of drinks with friends may sound like a recipe for fun, if you have a few too many, you become less aware of what is going on around you and more vulnerable to anyone who wants to take advantage of you.

“If you drive after drinking alcohol, your reaction time becomes slower and this increases your risk of causing an accident.

“If you are out and about socialising in Calderdale, drink sensibly and if you are going to drink at all, leave your car at home.”

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