The changing face of buildings in Huddersfield over the last 50 years will be highlighted in a new guide.

And the revised Pevsner guide will show the dramatic changes to the skyline in the town since it was first published in 1959.

The guide was revised in 1967, and the new one will look at how the town’s architecture has evolved through the decades.

It will be featured at a special evening organised by Huddersfield Civic Society next month.

Our video above shows some of the dramatic changes to Huddersfield's town centre since the start of the 1900s — click above to watch

This picture looking north over Huddersfield was taken from the roof of the new Civic Centre, in High Street in the 1960s. It shows among other landmarks the YEB cooling towers in St. Andrew's Road, the Parish Church spire. the Market Hall clock and the new Woolworth building under construction.
This picture looking north over Huddersfield was taken from the roof of the new Civic Centre, in High Street in the 1960s. It shows among other landmarks the YEB cooling towers in St. Andrew's Road, the Parish Church spire. the Market Hall clock and the new Woolworth building under construction.

The revised edition included many Huddersfield buildings that have since been demolished including the 1880 Market Hall, the Pack Horse Hotel, much of Queen Street, the east end of Ramsden Street, including the public baths, and the east side of the Market Place.

Other buildings have changed dramatically such as the former Methodist Mission, which is now the Lawrence Batley Theatre, the Royal Infirmary on New North Road, St Andrews Church on Leeds Road, and the Lion Chambers building, where the stone lion has been replaced by a fibreglass copy.

The redevelopment of the town centre from 1968 to 1973, the ring road, the growth of the university and Kingsgate, have all had massive effects on the town.

And new buildings featured include HSBC on New Street, the John Smith’s Stadium, and Huddersfield Leisure Centre.

The Pevsner Buildings of England is a series of guide books to the architecture of the country. Begun in the 1940s by art historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, the 46 volumes were published between 1951 and 1974.

Architectural historian Joseph Sharples has researched and written the revised entry for Huddersfield for the forthcoming West Riding: South volume.

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He will speak about how he approached the task at a free Huddersfield Civic Society event at Huddersfield Town Hall on Tuesday, June 7, at 7.30pm.

Some of the images used in our video are available to buy from the Kirklees Image Archive - for information on the collection and how to purchase images follow this link