It had lain hidden below a village school for more than a century.

But now a 101-year-old has been opened up to reveal its secrets.

The capsule was opened in Kirkheaton Parish Church, having been buried under the foundation stone when the extension to the former Church School was erected on June 14, 1913.

It was discovered during building work a week ago.

The capsule was a Kilner jar, which has local connections, being made at their factory just a little way down the road in Thornhill Lees on the edge of Dewsbury.

In the jar were a copy of the Huddersfield Chronicle, West Yorkshire Advertiser and Yorkshire Post for that day, a parish magazine for June 1913 and an order of service for laying the stone.

Hidden away all those years! The time capsule is finally unearthed during demolition work on the Old School.
Hidden away all those years! The time capsule is finally unearthed during demolition work on the Old School.
 

It was opened with the supervision of Katina Bill, curator of Tolson Museum and with the help of a little WD40 and the Rector of Kirkheaton, Richard Steel’s Swiss Army knife.

Enjoying the excitement were children from Kirkheaton Primary School, a lady whose father was at the school when the capsule was buried, vice-chairman of Kirkburton Parish Council, members of the Kirkheaton Family History group and other members of the church and community.

“It was great to be able to connect with this part of our past,” said Mr Steel. “The discovery caused a lot of excitement locally, and the opening has been a really good community event.

“After a quick look through we’ve discovered that we had a parish nurse at that time, which is quite fascinating. I look forward to seeing what more we can learn.”

Ms Bill said: “It was great to see this, we haven’t seen one in a long while.

“It is very impressive. The paper is really well preserved, the seal completely intact, no moisture had go in.

“It even still has that ‘newly printed’ smell, and no signs of damage.”

Sam Gallant, head teacher at Kirkheaton Primary School added: “What is good for us is trying to imagine what life was like for the children then - and realising that within a year these children would be caught up in World War One”

Opening of 101 year old time capsule at St. John's, Kirkheaton - Tolson Museum Curator Katina Bill and Rev. Richard Steel with children from Kirkheaton Primary School.
Opening of 101 year old time capsule at St. John's, Kirkheaton - Tolson Museum Curator Katina Bill and Rev. Richard Steel with children from Kirkheaton Primary School.
 

James Mallinson, 10, said the capsule was “Fascinating” while Oliver Hayton, 10, added: “It’s exciting to see what they did in a time capsule then.”

Nine-year-old Melissa Waller, said: “I feel really privileged to see these things opened. The first people to see them in 101 years!”

Verity Fountain, 10, said: “Very fascinating to see all the newspapers from the past - kind of surprised how big the papers are and how small the print is.”

The material will be preserved and go on display in the church.