Calderdale Council has announced that a Repair and Renew grant is now available for properties affected by the floods on Boxing Day 2015.

Up to £5,000 can be claimed for work that will help to protect buildings against future flooding. This can be for work which will help to reduce flood damage, or which will make it easier to clean up and dry out a home or business afterwards.

This could include installing removable cupboards, self-closing airbricks and non-return valves, replacing wooden floors with polished concrete or tiles and using water resistant mortar and lime based plaster when doing repairs.

Video: Flooding in Elland

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The news comes as it was revealed the final bill for the flood damage caused by this winter’s storms is likely to reach £1.3 billion.

The Association of British Insurers (ABI) said the figureis made up of flooding damage caused by storms Desmond, Eva and Frank during December and over the New Year to homes, businesses and motor vehicles.

The ABI said that nearly £24 million-worth of emergency payments have already been made to families and businesses following the devastation caused by this winter’s storms.

And more than 3,000 families are now in alternative accommodation while their homes are being repaired.

In pictures: Flooding in Kirklees and Calderdale

The ABI, whose figures are based on detailed data collected from its members, said that the average payout expected for each domestic flood claim is £50,000 - compared with an average payout of £31,000 following the winter storms of 2013/14.

READ MORE: Hardship payments of £500 on way for people in flood-hit Calderdale homes

READ MORE: Watch the devastation caused by the floods between Brighouse and Elland

Calderdale staff are now investigating where community schemes might work and how these can be designed.

Council leader Tim Swift said: “We want to encourage as many people as possible to take up these grants. Although the scale of the floods this time meant that many homes and businesses were overwhelmed, we did see good examples of where earlier flood protection work helped some people cope better in the aftermath.”