A surgery run by a prominent doctor has been placed in special measures after receiving an ‘inadequate’ rating by a government watchdog.

Windsor Medical Centre, run by Dr Ajit Mehrotra, was rated ‘inadequate’ in three out of five criteria in a report by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

The surgery, off Leeds Road, Dewsbury, was given the lowest rating for its safety, effectiveness and leadership.

While the practice was given ‘good’ ratings for its caring approach and responsiveness to patients’ needs it has been placed in special measures.

This means it will be inspected again within six months of the previous inspection.

If the practice fails to improve, which includes receiving a single further ‘inadequate’ rating, the practice may be closed.

Dr Mehrotra is chairman of the Dewsbury division of the Kirklees Local Medical Committee, a statutory body representing the interests of GPs in the borough.

The practice had failed to carry out risk assessments in health and safety, control of hazardous substances, fire safety and legionella

Following an inspection at the surgery in January, the CQC team reported that not all incidents and significant events had been reported and investigated.

The CQC team found that the practice had failed to carry out risk assessments in health and safety, control of hazardous substances, fire safety and legionella – a waterborne bacteria causing Legionnaires’ disease.

Inspectors said that while practice staff had the clinical skills, knowledge and experience to work effectively they had not been given up-to-date compulsory training.

The surgery was criticised for its mixture of paper and electronic patients records and its incomplete records for storing controlled drugs.

Windsor Medical Centre was, however, praised for its well-equipped facilities, treating its patients compassionately and its support of staff members.

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Sue McMillan, CQC Deputy Chief Inspector of General Practice, said: “It is important that the people who are registered with the practice can rely on getting the high quality care which everyone is entitled to receive from their GP.

“It is disappointing that the practice was rated inadequate, however, this will be an opportunity for the practice to address these issues. I am pleased that the practice has accepted our findings and undertaken to address these.

“Placing the practice in special measures will mean it can access external support to make the improvements necessary for good patient care.”