Huddersfield is dangerously close to becoming one of the worst-hit places for flu - as the deadly Aussie flu' strains sweeps the country.

An online map - covers all types of influenza - shows how many cases there are in every area of the UK, using a colour gradient indicating everything from no reports to 'very high' numbers of reports.

Blue areas show the areas largely unaffected by flu right now while the red areas mean there has been a spike in cases.

Huddersfield is purple - which illustrates there have been cases and it is in danger of becoming a red zone.

Halifax , Dewsbury and Wakefield are all pink which show they have even more cases reported.

It comes as hospitals in the region struggle to cope with demand with norovirus already on wards at Huddersfield and Calderdale hospitals.

The data from the map is used by researchers at Public Health England and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, reports The Mirror .

The 'Aussie flu' strain - also known as H3N2 - has reached the UK and is now strengthening its grip with an increasing number of cases being reported firstly in Ireland and now in the UK.

Doctors are warning that children - particularly those aged between five and 14 - could be most at risk.

Public health officials are urging people who are eligible for the free flu vaccination should “get it without delay”.

This year’s flu vaccine has been developed to tackle the main strains which are circulating this season, including H3N2.

A number of strains of the virus, but particularly H3N2, led to Australia’s worst flu season for nearly a decade.

The arrival of so-called Aussie flu comes as NHS England urged hospitals to defer pre-planned operations and routine outpatient appointments until the end of the month.

What is Aussie flu?

The winter bug known as H3N2 - a subtype of influenza A - has reportedly been blamed for more than 300 deaths in Australia, reports The Mirror , with around 170,000 cases in total.

Some A&E units Down Under were said to be "standing room only" after being inundated with people struck down by the illness.

It was the largest outbreak seen in Australia for some time. Aussie flu mainly affects the elderly and people who are vulnerable due to long-term health conditions. Children and pregnant women are also at risk.

It can lead to pneumonia and other potentially deadly health complications.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of H3N2 are similar to other strains of the flu, but can be more severe.

They can include:

  • Body aches
  • Coughing
  • Exhaustion
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Minor congestion
  • Sore throat
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea

How is it treated?

People have been urged to get a flu jab to protect themselves from the H3N2 strain.

Those who don't heed that advice and are diagnosed by a GP may be prescribed an anti-viral medication to treat their symptoms.

People who haven't been diagnosed but think they have the flu can speak to a pharmacist to find out if there are any over-the-counter medications they can take.

This year's vaccine in Australia wasn't as effective as hoped because the virus had mutated, it was reported.

People can prevent the virus from spreading by washing their hands regularly, covering their mouth and nose with tissues or a sleeve when they cough or sneeze, and cleaning surfaces they suspect are infected.

What do the experts say?

Experts have warned that this year's strain of Aussie flu could be more dangerous than the 1968 flu pandemic that killed over a million worldwide.

Public health expert Professor Robert Dingwall, of Nottingham Trent University, told it's "almost inevitable" that Aussie flu will strike Britain this winter.

He warned: "The reports from Australia suggest the UK might be in for the worst winter flu season for many years."