It used to be a watering hole for thirsty students.

Now a derelict pub next to the University of Huddersfield could provide plush surroundings to dozens who study there.

Plans have been lodged to revamp the former New Wharf pub at Aspley into an upmarket block.

The new proposal would see the abandoned boozer turned into one of the most luxurious student accommodations in town.

It would be aimed at rich overseas students and would feature a mix of one and two bed apartments and studio flats.

The pub on the corner of Wakefield Road and Firth Street, would be partially demolished and a modern looking five storey student block would be built around the Victorian facade.

A student flat scheme that was already approved at the site, involving the total demolition of the pub, never began.

A spokesman for the developer, said: “The proposal seeks to retain the historic facade of this prominent building and create an iconic student accommodation facility near the University.

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“This design involves creating a cantilevered pod projecting over the original entrance.

“The facility will will provide 45 bedrooms in a range of apartment configurations, all with ensuite bathrooms.

“As a high quality development it will have a concierge service, spacious rooms and dedicated cycle store.

Former Wharf pub, Aspley, Huddersfield.

“The proposal is more sympathetic than the previously approved scheme which involved the total demolition of the New Wharf pub.”

A proposal document argues that the “gateway location” of the premises requires a grander scheme in keeping with other tall buildings in the area.

The pub itself is not listed but it is next to a row of Grade 2 listed properties.

One full time and three part-time jobs would likely be created by the facility, the developer has claimed.

The plan is open for public consultation until June 21.

It is thought the pub dates back to the first half of the 19th century with an 1851 map showing a Wharfe Inn at the site.