It’s not for the faint-hearted.

There are no comforting walls to grip and you can’t put your feet down on a nicely tiled surface.

But three Huddersfield men are putting their nerves to one side to take part in the swim of their lives along with more than 100 swimmers from all parts of the country.

Dan Smith, a 38-year-old project sales director of Kirkburton, agreed with two friends to take on the famous Chillswim at one of the most scenic locations in the UK – picturesque Coniston Water in the Lake District.

On Saturday, September 6, he and Neil Lucas, a 40-year-old builder, of Clayton West and Tim Schofield, a 40-year-old, police officer from Birds Edge, will attempt to swim the length of Coniston Water, a freezing five-and-a-quarter miles, for a charity very close to Dan’s heart - The Paul Daisley Trust (in aid of bowel cancer).

Dan, a keen swimmer for the past two years, said: “I’m a keen sportsman I but may have got out of my depth!

“Myself and friends are novices to open water swimming and have recently joined the Wakefield triathlete club on a Sunday morning as preparation to our mammoth goal.

“We began training at Scissett swimming baths and our first Pugney’s Country Park experience was a couple of weeks ago, very different and difficult in comparison to indoor swimming. Being honest I’m slightly nervous.

Open swimming in the glorious waters of Lake Coniston - Chillswim set to take place in September 2014.
Open swimming in the glorious waters of Lake Coniston - Chillswim set to take place in September 2014.
 

“Five-and-a-half miles is a long distance to run let alone swim in freezing temperatures.

“But we have been putting a lot of training in since we agreed to do it some months ago and we will all give it our very best shot.

“The greatest distance I have swum was in Scissett and that was three miles so this will be a big step up.”

So far more than £800 has been raised for The Paul Daisley Trust set up in honour of Dan’s uncle who died at the aged of 45.

Last year 250 swimmers braved the course with some coming from as far away as Cornwall, Devon and Inverness.

Finish times ranged from 2hrs 17mins to six hours. Jelly babies and bananas were provided for sustenance.