Tributes have poured in from all sides of politics to the veteran Labour politician and former cabinet minister Tony Benn, who has died at home at the age of 88

Huddersfield MP Barry Sheerman told of his relationship with the MP. He said: “I had a room next door to Tony in Commons at one stage and he was someone you could absolutely disagree with politically and could come to knock down blows with one minute but have a cup of tea with him the next.

"You could never really fall out with him.”

He said their turbulent working relationship stemmed to the contest for the then-named Huddersfield East seat prior to the 1979 general election.

“Tony’s special advisor Stuart Holland was a contender for the Huddersfield East so there was a bit of a contest for Huddersfield.

“But we joked about it all in the end.

“He truly was one of the big beasts of politics.

“He was dominate from the mid 20th century and remained so even in the late 20th century - he believed in democracy and recognised that you needed to be in the town halls and the public halls meeting with the public.

“But lets not forget he was also ahead of his time, he was Mr Techology and he put money into Concorde and he was very pro Europe.

“There was never a dull moment with Tony and I don’t think we’ll see the likes of him in politics again.”

Labour leader Ed Miliband described the former figurehead of the Labour left as an "iconic figure" and said the party had lost a "champion of the powerless, a great parliamentarian and a conviction politician".

Tony Benn pictured in 2008
Tony Benn pictured in 2008
 

Prime Minister David Cameron said that Mr Benn ensured there was "never a dull moment", even for those who disagreed with every word he said.

First elected to parliament in 1950, Mr Benn renounced a peerage in order to remain in the House of Commons and was an MP for more than 50 years, serving in the cabinets of Harold Wilson and James Callaghan and staging a bitterly divisive battle with Denis Healey for the Labour deputy leadership as the champion of the left in 1981.

He famously retired from parliament in 2001 saying he wanted to "spend more time on politics" and won a new status as a national treasure touring the country to speak to packed audiences in venues from town halls to West End theatres and the Glastonbury festival. Well into his 80s, he was a familiar and popular figure at demonstrations and anti-war rallies.

In a statement released early today, his children Stephen, Hilary, Melissa and Joshua said: "It is with great sadness that we announce that our father Tony Benn died peacefully early this morning at his home in west London surrounded by his family.

"We would like to express our heartfelt thanks to all the NHS staff and carers who have looked after him with such kindness in hospital and at home.

"We will miss above all his love which has sustained us throughout our lives. But we are comforted by the memory of his long, full and inspiring life and so proud of his devotion to helping others as he sought to change the world for the better."

Mr Miliband paid tribute to an "iconic figure of our age".

Mr Miliband said: "Tony Benn spoke his mind and spoke up for his values. Whether you agreed with him or disagreed with him, everyone knew where he stood and what he stood for.

Tony Benn in 2002 addressing protestors at an anti-war rally in Trafalgar Square
Tony Benn in 2002 addressing protestors at an anti-war rally in Trafalgar Square
 

"For someone of such strong views, often at odds with his party, he won respect from across the political spectrum. This was because of his unshakeable beliefs and his abiding determination that power and the powerful should be held to account.

"He believed in movements and mobilised people behind him for the causes he cared about, often unfashionable ones. In a world of politics that is often too small, he thought big about our country and our world.

"Above all, as I had cause to know, he was an incredibly kind man. I did work experience with him at the age of 16. I may have been just a teenager but he treated me as an equal. It was the nature of the man and the principle of his politics.

"I saw him for the last time a couple of weeks ago in hospital. He may have been ailing in body but was as sharp as ever in mind. As I left he said to me 'well, old son. Let's have a proper talk when you have more time'."

Mr Cameron said: "I am sorry to hear that Tony Benn has died. He was a magnificent writer, speaker, diarist and campaigner, with a strong record of public and political service.

"There was never a dull moment listening to him, even when you disagreed with every word he said."

Labour's former prime minister Gordon Brown said: "Tony Benn was a powerful, fearless, relentless advocate for social justice and people's rights whose writing as well as speeches will continue to have a profound influence on generations to come.

"My thoughts are with his family, whom he adored."

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